Where the Wild Things Are

Leave your to-do lists, worries and all other “grown-up” anxieties at the door when you enter the theater to view October’s highly anticipated film, Where the Wild Things Are. Director Spike Jonze, alongside a talented cast and crew, have successfully brought to life the tale of Maurice Sendak’s classic picture book to the big screen.

The story follows Max, a rambunctious little boy who disengages in the troubles of his life by adventuring to far off lands unknown to this world. After a tiff at the dinner table with his mother, Max runs away from home and journeys to a land of self discovery where he befriends a wild bunch of characters. In hopes that Max can mend their torn community, the ‘Wild Things’ crown him as their King. But is Max fit to be the king of the ‘Wild Things’ when he is but a boy himself?

In collaboration with Sendak, Jonze was able to put a modern spin on the story without detaching from the original essence of the book. In their attempts to masterfully recreate the book, a mix of computer graphics and puppetry were used to bring the monsters and their world to life. Costume designer, Casey Storm, hit a home run with the outfits used in the film; Max’s dirty wolf suit contrasts remarkably well against the ‘Wild Things’ earth tone motif. The combination of storyline, cinematography, and costumes (not to mention the talents of the cast itself) made the world of the ‘Wild Things’ nothing short of phenomenal.

As a viewer of the film and a devote lover of the book, I found that Spike Jonze beautifully brought the story to life on the big screen. Although no one likes to face the reality and responsibility of growing up, we have to at some point. Where the Wild Things Are is a retreat from the everyday hustle and bustle world we live in and allows us a moment to sit back, relax, and relive a piece of our childhood.

-Candice M. Grimm

cgrimm01@hamline.edu

Leave your to-do lists, worries and all other “grown-up” anxieties at the door when you enter the theater to view October’s highly anticipated film, Where the Wild Things Are. Director Spike Jonze, alongside a talented cast and crew, have successfully brought to life the tale of Maurice Sendak’s classic picture book to the big screen.

The story follows Max, a rambunctious little boy who disengages in the troubles of his life by adventuring to far of lands unknown to this world. After a tiff at the dinner table with his mother blows up, Max runs away from home and journeys to a land of self discovery where he befriends a wild bunch of characters. In hopes that Max can mend their torn community, the ‘Wild Things’ crown him as their King. But is Max fit to be the king of the ‘Wild Things’ when he is but a boy himself?

In collaboration with Sendak, Jonze was able to put a modern spin on the story without detaching from the original essence of the book. In their attempts to masterfully recreate the book, a mix of computer graphics and puppetry were used to bring the monsters and their world to life. Costume designer Casey Storm hit a home run with the outfits used in the film; Max’s dirty wolf suit contrasts remarkably well against the ‘Wild Things’ earth tone motif. The combination of storyline, cinematography, and costumes (not to mention the talents of the cast itself,) made the world of the ‘Wild Things’ nothing short of phenomenal.

As a viewer of the film and a devote lover of the book, I found that Spike Jonze beautifully brought the story to life on the big screen. Although no one likes to face the reality and responsibility of growing up, we have to at some point. Where the Wild Things Are is a retreat from the everyday hustle and bustle world we live in and allows us a moment to sit back, relax, and relive a piece of our childhood.

-Candice M. Grimm

Cgrimm01@hamline.edu


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