The Beautiful and Damned

Minnesota native, F. Scott Fitzgerald may have passed away years ago but his legacy lives on as generation after generation is introduced to his writing.

I first encountered the seductive writings of Fitzgerald in ninth grade. The Great Gatsby was the first novel I read of his and I quickly fell for his descriptive details and romantic metaphors that filled each page.

Fitzgerald’s writings have a way of capturing the reader into the moment, making them feel a part of the story. He used his life experiences to influence the stories and characters of his novels. In The Beautiful and Damned this standard could not hold truer.

Fitzgerald married the love of his life, Zelda Sayre, in 1920. Their lives of excess and chaos are portrayed in Fitzgerald’s second novel The Beautiful and Damned. The novel follows two main characters, an aspiring writer Anthony Patch and his wife, Gloria, who become infatuated by the fast life and glamour of the Jazz Age. The twists and turns of Gloria and Anthony’s world unfold as they selfishly toil through the muck of high society.

The classic tale of The Beautiful and Damned is now not only available to my fellow bookworms, but movie goers as well! Director John Curran has taken Fitzgerald’s novel and transformed it to the big screen. The film, starring Keira Knightley, is set to begin production in the spring of 2010. But, if you can’t wait that long to unravel the story of Anthony and Gloria, stop by any local bookstore and grab a copy of The Beautiful and Damned for yourself. You won’t be disappointed.

Candice M. Grimm
cgrimm01@hamline.edu

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One response

  1. Fitzgerald really is great. I hadn’t heard about this film, yet, but now I’m looking forward to it!

    December 27, 2009 at 1:04 am

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